Passiflora arida

(Masters & Rose) Killip

J. Wash. Acad. Sci. 12: 256. 1922.

Introduced
Basionyms: Passiflora foetida var. arida Masters & Rose Contr. U.S. Natl. Herb. 5: 182. 1899
Treatment appears in FNA Volume 6. Treatment on page 177. Mentioned on page 173, 174.

Stems terete, densely woolly-hairy. Leaves pungent, densely woolly-hairy, with obscurely glandular or eglandular bristles; stipules pectinate, 2–5 × 3–8 mm, with obscurely glandular or eglandular bristles or hairs; petiole with obscurely glandular or eglandular bristles or hairs; blade roughly symmetric, 3–6 × 2–7 cm, deeply (3–) 5–7 (–9) -lobed, middle lobe longer than lateral lobes, margins entire or serrate; abaxial fine veins weakly to moderately raised but obscured by pubescence, abaxial nectaries absent. Floral bracts pinnatifid, 16–28 × 14–28 mm, margins entire or dentate, with obscurely glandular or eglandular bristles or hairs. Flowers: floral-tube cuplike, 3–5 mm deep; sepals white, 13–23 × 5–9 mm; petals white, 14–20 × 5–8 mm; corona filament whorls 5–6, outer 2 whorls purple to magenta basally, white medially, pale-pink apically, linear, terete, 10–17 mm. Berries green to pale yellow-green, ovoid, 2–3 × 15–25 mm.


Phenology: Flowering Jul–Aug.
Habitat: Deserts and desert grasslands, urban areas and disturbed sites, usually near adequate water run-off
Elevation: 300–1200 m

Distribution

V6 318-distribution-map.jpg

Introduced; Ariz., Mexico (Baja California), Mexico (Baja California Sur), Mexico (Sonora)

Discussion

In the flora area, Passiflora arida is known only from the vicinity of Tucson, where it is introduced. Although native to desert and semidesert areas, in cultivation, this species readily adapts to mesic conditions, grows aggressively, is self-pollinating, and exhibits rapid seed germination, suggesting that it could become a problematic, widespread weed (D. H. Goldman 2003). In recent years it has been distributed in the horticultural trade and among enthusiasts, misidentified as P. foetida var. arizonica. In greenhouse cultivation this plant can produce leaves less densely hairy and much larger than those described above.

Selected References

None.

Lower Taxa

None.

... more about "Passiflora arida"
short-to-elongate +
versatile +  and dorsifixed +
Douglas H. Goldman +  and John M. MacDougal +
(Masters & Rose) Killip +
smooth;rough or corky +
cuneate;cordate +
Passiflora foetida var. arida +
green +  and pale yellow-green +
0.2 cm2 mm <br />0.002 m <br /> (0.3 cm3 mm <br />0.003 m <br />) +
1.5 cm15 mm <br />0.015 m <br /> (2.5 cm25 mm <br />0.025 m <br />) +
3 cm30 mm <br />0.03 m <br /> (6 cm60 mm <br />0.06 m <br />) +
(3-)5-7(-9)-lobed +
2cm;7cm +
scattered;whorled +
eglandular +  and glandular +
Ariz. +, Mexico (Baja California) +, Mexico (Baja California Sur) +  and Mexico (Sonora) +
300–1200 m +
0.3 cm3 mm <br />0.003 m <br /> (0.5 cm5 mm <br />0.005 m <br />) +
1.6 cm16 mm <br />0.016 m <br /> (2.8 cm28 mm <br />0.028 m <br />) +
14mm +  and 28mm +
unisexual +  and bisexual +
Deserts and desert grasslands, urban areas and disturbed sites, usually near adequate water run-off +
many-branched +  and simple +
paired +  and solitary +
woolly-hairy +
membranous +
dentate +, entire +  and serrate +
3[-5]-carpellate +
1.4 cm14 mm <br />0.014 m <br /> (2 cm20 mm <br />0.02 m <br />) +
0.5 cm5 mm <br />0.005 m <br /> (0.8 cm8 mm <br />0.008 m <br />) +
Flowering Jul–Aug. +
J. Wash. Acad. Sci. +
compressed +
0.5 cm5 mm <br />0.005 m <br /> (0.9 cm9 mm <br />0.009 m <br />) +
Introduced +
2-lobed;clavate;reniform +
0.2 cm2 mm <br />0.002 m <br /> (0.5 cm5 mm <br />0.005 m <br />) +
pectinate +
0.3 cm3 mm <br />0.003 m <br /> (0.8 cm8 mm <br />0.008 m <br />) +
distinct +
grooved +  and reticulate +
Passiflora arida +
Passiflora +
species +
obscured +  and raised +
hairy +  and glabrous +
herbaceous +  and woody +
pale-pink +, white +, purple +  and magenta basally +
1 cm10 mm <br />0.01 m <br /> (1.7 cm17 mm <br />0.017 m <br />) +